Name: 
 

SRA Starting Level Guide



Multiple Choice
Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.
 
 
The sandy beach is a good place to find treasure. A smooth stone or a shiny shell can look like a jewel. If you are lucky, you may find another treasure--a rubber duck! If you find just the right duck, you can receive a reward.

In January 1992 a ship was sailing the ocean. The ship was sailing from China to Seattle, Washington. During a storm, part of what the ship was carrying fell into the ocean. Yellow rubber ducks, red beavers, blue turtles, and green frogs floated away from the ship. The words "The First Years" are printed on the bottom of the toys.

The ship lost its cargo, but scientists gained something. The plastic toys offer a way to track the ocean's current. The flow of water in the ocean is the current. The toys move with the ocean's current. So far the ducks have drifted to Alaska and Seattle. Some have floated to Russia. Scientists think some of the toys may end up in Iceland or Africa. It is possible a few will turn up in Boston.

The toys have lost most of their color by now, but if you find the right rubber duck or one of its friends, you can receive a $100 U.S. savings bond. You will leave to tell the scientists exactly where you found it. Think of all of the places that the ducks, beavers, turtles and frogs have seen!
 

 1. 

If you find the right duck on the beach, you can receive...
a.
candy.
c.
a savings bond.
b.
a medal.
d.
a beaver.
 

 2. 

The ship was sailing on the ocean in...
a.
January.
c.
February.
b.
April.
d.
June.
 

 3. 

The ship was sailing from China to...
a.
New York.
c.
Texas.
b.
Seattle.
d.
California.
 

 4. 

The toys could...
a.
float
c.
swim
b.
sink
 

 5. 

Scientists used the floating toys to track the...
a.
direction of the wind.
c.
direction of the ocean current.
b.
color of the water.
d.
price of rubber toys.
 

 6. 

Scientists are waiting to see...
a.
where the toys end up.
c.
what color the beavers are now.
b.
how the ducks fell out of the ship.
 

 7. 

If you find the right rubber duck you have to...
a.
tell the scientists where you found it.
c.
put it back in the ocean.
b.
tell your teacher.
 

 8. 

The ocean current is the...
a.
air that blows the sails on a ship.
c.
direction the water flows.
b.
way that ships travel.
 
 
"Old woman," grumbled the burly man who had just heard Sojourner Truth speak, "do you think your talk about slavery does any good? I don't care any more for your talk than I do for the bite of a flea."

The tall imposing African American woman turned her piercing eyes on him. "Perhaps not," she answered, "but I'll keep you scratching."

This incident during the 1840s defines who Sojourner Truth was: utterly dedicated to spreading her message, afraid of no one, and forceful and witty in speech.

Yet forty years earlier, who could have suspected that a spindly slave girl growing up in a damp cellar in upstate New York would become one of the most remarkable women in American History? Her name then was Isabella. (Many slaves had no last names). By the time she was fourteen, both her parents had passed away, and she had been sold several times. By 1827 when New York freed its slaves, she had married and bore five children.

The first hint of Isabella's fighting spirit came soon afterward, when her youngest son was illegally seized and sold. She marched to the courthouse and badgered officials until her son was returned to her.

In 1843, inspired by religion, she changed her name to Sojourner (meaning, "one who stays briefly") Truth. With only pennies in her purse, she set out to preach against slavery. From New England to Minnesota she trekked, gaining a reputation for her plain but dynamic and moving words. Incredibly, despite being African American and female (only white males were expected to be public speakers), she drew thousands of people to town halls, tents, and churches to hear her powerful, deep-voiced pleas on equality for African Americans--and for women. Often she had to face threatening hoodlums. Once she stood before armed bullies and sang a hymn to them. Awed by her courage and her commanding presence, they sheepishly retreated.

During the Civil War, she cared for homeless ex-slaves in Washington. President Lincoln invited her to the White House to bestow praise upon her. Later she petitioned Congress to help former slaves get land in the West. She also convinced the cit of Washington to integrate its trolley cars so that African Americans and whites could ride together.

Shortly before her death at age eighty-six, she
was asked what kept her going. "I think of great things," Sojourner Truth replied.
 

 9. 

The imposing African American woman promised to keep the man...
a.
searching.
c.
hollering.
b.
crying.
d.
scratching.
 

 10. 

This incident occurred in the....
a.
1760s.
c.
1840s.
b.
1900s.
d.
1920s.
 

 11. 

Isabella lost both parents by the time she was...
a.
twenty-seven.
c.
seven.
b.
two.
d.
fourteen.
 

 12. 

When New York freed its slaves, Isabella had...
a.
problems.
c.
five children.
b.
no children.
d.
an education.
 

 13. 

Her name change was inspired by....
a.
a fighting spirit.
c.
her freedom.
b.
religion.
d.
officials.
 

 14. 

Sojourner preached against...
a.
war.
c.
Congress.
b.
slavery.
d.
fighting.
 

 15. 

She persuaded the city of Washington to...
a.
clean its trolleys.
c.
give land grants.
b.
integrate its trolleys.
d.
care for ex-slaves.
 

 16. 

She cared for homeless...
a.
cats.
c.
lawyers.
b.
soldiers.
d.
ex-slaves.
 



 
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